Social and Emotional Learning and Bullying Prevention

21-page briefing paper prepared for the National Center for Mental Health Promotion and Youth Violence Prevention by the Collaborative for Academic, Social, and Emotional Learning
(CASEL) and the Social and Emotional Learning Research Group at the University of
Illinois at Chicago. “Schools using a social and emotional learning (SEL) framework can foster an overall climate of inclusion, warmth, and respect, and promote the development of core social and emotional skills among both students and staff. Because bullying prevention is entirely congruent with SEL, it can be embedded in a school’s SEL framework. The aims of this brief are to (a) provide a basic description of a school-wide SEL framework, (b) illustrate the relationship between social and emotional factors and bullying, and (c) explain how an SEL framework can be extended to include bullying prevention.”

Creating schoolwide prevention and intervention strategies: Effective strategies…

55-page PDF document which is “intended to put the issue of schoolwide violence prevention in context for educators and outline an approach for choosing and creating effective prevention programs. The guide covers the following topics: 1. Why schoolwide prevention strategies are critical, 2. Characteristics of a safe school, 3. Four sources of vulnerability to school violence, 4. How to plan for strategies that meet school safety needs, 5. Five effective response strategies and 6. Useful Web and print resources.”

Bullying and teasing of youth with disabilities: Creating positive school environments for effective

Issue brief from the National Center on Secondary Education and Transition (NCSET) (December 2003, V. 2, issue 3) which discusses the problem of bullying of youth with disabilities. “Although bullying and teasing are often considered a harmless activity, research shows that they may result in serious short- and long-term negative consequences. Youth with disabilities are particularly vulnerable and represent a high-risk group for becoming both potential victims and perpetrators of bullying and teasing. Addressing this issue in isolation is not the answer. Comprehensive, school-wide reform programs are a proactive strategy for meeting the needs of youth with disabilities, the student body at large, school staff, families, and community members.”

Evaluation of the Truancy Prevention through Mediation Program (Ohio)

12-page pdf presents an evaluation of the Truancy Prevention through Mediation Program developed in Ohio. “Although the Truancy Prevention through Mediation Program (TPMP) has consistently demonstrated positive results in the effort to combat truancy, absent from these evaluations has been an examination of the impact of the program on the academic performance and behavior of the children whose families participate in the program. To fill this void, the Ohio Commission on Dispute Resolution and the Supreme Court of Ohio collaborated to commission an independent evaluation to ascertain answers to these questions.” This report summarizes the findings from this study.

Gender based violence: Challenging norms, building capacities, promising practices, creating peace

16-page Powerpoint presentation given at the Second International Summit on Conflict Resolution Education which “provide[s] a new context for prevention of intimate partner, domestic and sexual violence, participants will build their capacity to engage in social change work, learn current promising and best practices for intimate partner and sexual violence prevention.”

Men stopping rape exercises

Pdf article from Conflict Management in Higher Education Report, Volume 6, Number 1, (Nov 2005), which presents a “list of some of the exercises developed by the members of Men Stopping Rape in Madison, WI, for use in anti-rape workshops, I compiled this list for use in Syracuse at a Man-to-Man training program entitled ‘Practical Strategies for Ending Abuse: A Skill Training for Educators.'”

Doing anti-rape work: One man’s perspective

Pdf article from Conflict Management in Higher Education Report, Volume 6, Number 1, (Nov 2005), which discusses the author’s “anti-rape prevention work with men [which] means trying to reduce the likelihood that the men who attend a workshop will behave in ways that are assaultive.”

Extending campus conflict resolution efforts beyond the mediation table

Pdf article from Conflict Management in Higher Education Report, Volume 2, Number 3, (May 2002), which “describes creative responses to campus conflict that don’t rely on mediation as their central strategy or approach, providing links to online examples when available.”

CRE vs. violence prevention

This document compares Conflict Resolution Education with related violence prevention work.