The Challenge of Culture Change: Embedding Restorative Practice in Schools

Paper presented at the Sixth International Conference on Conferencing, Circles and other Restorative Practices: “Building a Global Alliance for Restorative Practices and Family Empowerment”. Sydney, Australia,March 3-5, 2005. Argues that Restorative practice, with its emphasis on relationships, demands that schools attend to all aspects of the school culture and organisation and that they develop a range of relational practices that help prevent incidents of inappropriate behaviour from arising in the first place. Presents stages for the implementation of this kind of cultural change process.

Implementing restorative justice: A guide for schools

This 24-page pdf is designed to introduce the concepts of restorative justice and restorative discipline to school personnel. “The guide advises on the use of the restorative justice philosophy to achieve student accountability, competency development, as well as community safety. The guide is specifically designed to provide Illinois school personnel and families with practical strategies to use restorative justice in their daily activities.”

Teach kids a lesson … or help them to learn?

11-page PDF paper which promotes the idea of restorative justice practices in education as opposed to punitive ones. “Restorative justice philosophy views misbehavior in terms of how it has impacted upon relationships in the school community. Once the harm is acknowledged in a concrete way the process moves beyond harm to ask how can this harm be repaired? If schools are places of learning, where young people are encouraged to be independent and creative thinkers, are able to share their ideas and opinions, learn to accept the view of others, to be responsible and accountable for their learning, it stands to reason that the “punitive school” is being counter productive in achieving these desired outcomes.”

Continuum of [restorative justice] strategies

1-page PDF chart illustrating a continuum of restorative justice strategies, with an informal end where staff are provided with skills of how to engage young people in a dialogue that emphasises a greater sense of other and a more formal end with skills to restore damaged relationships following an incident or outburst.

Restorative justice in the school setting: A whole school approach

12-page PDF paper promoting the teaching of restorative justice in schools. “Restorative justice is a philosophy and a set of practices that embraces the right blend between a high degree of discipline that encompasses clear expectations, limits and consequences and a high degree of support and nurturance.”

Restorative justice programs in schools

Web-site created by the Marist Youth Care organization with information about restorative justice programs. “Marist Youth Care is a not for profit agency dealing with at risk young people. We draw our energy and motivation from the call of the gospel to assist socially disadvantaged people to take their rightful place in the community,” from the Marist Youth Care website.

40 cases: Restorative justice and victim-offender mediation

86-page book in PDF format which, “provides a diverse range of first hand accounts from mediators and facilitators offering some means of communication between victims and offenders. Through the authentic voices of practitioners, the cases unfold to reveal how communication was facilitated and the outcomes that followed. This publication aims to provide practitioners, policy makers and interested professionals with:
– Opportunities to compare practice
– An examination of the appropriateness of offering access to Restorative Justice
– An understanding of the subtleties of facilitated victim-offender communication
– An opportunity to see beyond our own preconceptions of victims and offenders
– Clarity and inspiration.”

Promoting SEAL through circle time

7-page PDF document promoting Social and Emotional Aspects of Learning through circle time for secondary students. “Circle time sessions provide a potential vehicle for the classroom delivery of the SEAL curriculum. Circle time is a time set aside each week when a whole class of young people and their teacher sit in a circle and explicitly engage in a structured programme of games, experiential activities, discussion and relaxation strategies … It aims to provide an emotionally safe forum for participants to engage with a range of key issues, including peer relationships, conflict resolution, shared goal setting, justice, friendship, democratic principles, respect for individual differences and freedom of choice.”

Incorporating restorative approaches

82-page PDF topic guide which presents a, “session plan, guidance and resources for training day focusing on incorporating restorative approaches. Aims to develop an understanding of restorative approaches and their role in behaviour and attendance improvement. The aim is also [to] develop an understanding of the leadership issues in incorporating restorative approaches and explore how restorative approaches might be developed in [one’s] own setting.” Also available is a related set of 12 slides in ppt format for use in training event.

Restorative Practices in Catholic School Communities: Audit Tools

33-page pdf providing 9 different assessment instruments for schools developing restorative practice initiatives. Prepared in Australia, “The…Audit Tools for Restorative Practices have been developed by the Student Wellbeing Team of the Catholic Education Office (Melbourne) for use by the Core Leadership Team and staff in the school. The purpose of the tools is to provide…both quantitative and qualitative data regarding the implementation of Restorative Practices strategies at the school level.”

What have I done: Victim empathy pack responsibility exercises

13-page Word document presenting a “new victim empathy resource designed to keep victim awareness high in Restorative Justice practitioner’s priorities.” Contains a number of exercises about taking responsibility for one’s actions and exploring feelings.

Statement of restorative justice principles: As applied in a school setting: 2nd edition

24-page PDF document of “Principles [which] form the basis for restorative practices in all settings, using all models, where the primary aims are to repair harm and promote dialogue … Restorative practices are underpinned by a set of values, these include: Empowerment, honesty, respect, engagement, voluntarism, healing, restoration, personal accountability, inclusiveness, collaboration, and problem-solving.”

Restorative justice in the classroom: Lesson 4 the justice circle part 2

5-page pdf lesson which provides “students with an understanding of the process of Justice Circles and teaching them how to use this strategy in conflict resolution. Students practice setting restorative consequences and assess whether the consequences they identify would be effective in both healing the victim and helping the offender learn a better way to behave.”

Restorative justice in the classroom: Lesson 3 the justice circle

13-page pdf lesson which “through role-play, students examine the Justice Circle as a way of developing a system of support for both the victim and offender. They learn roles of the participants in a Justice Circle and develop respect for the perspectives and feelings of everyone involved. This includes an overview of who should be involved and what participants might be experiencing/feeling– setting the ground rules for using this strategy to resolve conflict.”

Restorative justice in the classroom: Lesson 2 class meetings

8-page pdf lesson which “through role-play and discussion, this lesson will help students understand the motives behind offending and re-offending and to develop problem-solving consequences that will help offenders learn a better way to behave. By developing restorative consequences, the classroom community can help the offender repair the harm he/she has caused and discourage the offender from re-offending. Students practice consensus building and explore the consequence-setting aspect of justice circles.”