Exploring Humanitarian Law Curriculum Package

Exploring Humanitarian Law (EHL) is an adaptable toolkit that gives educators easy-to-use materials to expose students to issues of international humanitarian law, the rules that ensure respect for life and human dignity in war. The toolkit offers educators primary source materials and strategies that reinforce and enrich existing curricula and educational programs. The full curriculum is available for download as a 360+ page pdf.

Humanitarian law is a body of international law that aims to protect human dignity during armed conflict and to prevent or reduce the suffering and destruction that results from war. All nations are party to the Geneva Conventions, and therefore have a legal obligation to encourage the study of humanitarian law as widely as possible. These laws, together with the 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the 1989 Convention on the Rights of the Child, should be viewed as an integral part of today’s basic education.

Aligned with social studies requirements around the country, Exploring Humanitarian Law offers educators activities that can be used as a whole or mixed and matched into current lessons. High-quality materials, including news accounts, photos, letters, videos, case studies and interactive projects bring real events and people to life, helping teachers connect lessons of the past with events of today.

Culture of Peace End of Decade Review

In resolution 64/80, the General Assembly requested UNESCO to prepare a summary report on the activities carried out over the past ten years of the International Decade for a Culture of Peace and Non-Violence for the Children of the World (2001-2010) by UNESCO, other United Nations entities, Member States and civil society, including non-governmental organizations, to promote and implement the Programme of Action on a Culture of Peace.

This end of decade report was presented to the United Nations General Assembly at its 65th session in 2010.

UNESCO’S Work on Education for Peace and Non-Violence: Building Peace Through Education

A 20-page brochure providing an overview of UNESCO’s work in advocacy, policy, information exchange and the development of text books, learning materials and curricula. It was developed by the Section for the Promotion of Rights and Values in Education, Division for the Promotion of Basic Education. Included are links to many useful publications produced by UNESCO and its partners.

Teachers Without Borders Dr. Joseph Hungwa Memorial Peace Education Program

This 300+ page guide provides a full professional development curriculum in peace education. It was developed by Teachers Beyond Borders. The goal is to bring Peace Education to new audiences around the world.

The program is divided into three units, which progress on a continuum from theoretical to practical. Unit 1 provides the history of peace education, a selection of definitions, an overview of the key thinkers in the peace education field and the core concepts. Unit 2 focuses on the Scope of Peace Education, reviewing different approaches to peace education, or different lenses through which peace education can be viewed. Unit 3 moves from theory to practice, addressing the pedagogical approaches to peace education and practical ways to introduce peace education into your classroom and community.

Standards for Peace Education

11-page pdf provides a list of recommended standards for students, teachers and teacher educators with respect to peace education. They were developed under the leadership of Dr. Candice C. Carter from the University of North Florida during her global and domestic work with peace educators and peace education researchers. These dynamic standards have been used for students in all levels of education as well as for program design. Suggestions for, and outcomes of, their use in particular cultures and contexts are welcomed.

Global education guidelines: A handbook for educators to understand and implement global education

85-page pdf handbook “written on the premise that educational processes in formal and non-formal settings should open the path to a better understanding of an increasingly globalised world. It also raises important issues about the professional responsibilities of educators and teachers and the role of schools and different organisations and institutions in raising global awareness and knowledge on worldwide issues across the curriculum and in non-formal projects and activities … this document should be regarded as a guide for understanding and practising global education, also as a pedagogical coaching tool to help establish global education approaches where they do not yet exist and enrich existing ones. Its content was set up taking into account in-field practices and references and cultural, geographic, social and economic realities.”