Peace Pedagogy Learning Modules from Peacelearner.org

A series of learning modules developed by Daryn Cambridge for a Peace Pedagogy course he taught at American University in the Fall of 2012. The course was designed around seven pillars of peace education: community building, enabling multiple intelligences, nurturing emotional intelligence, exploring approaches to peace, re-framing history, transforming conflict nonviolently, and life-skills building. The learning modules were posted at the public website PeaceLearner.org as part of the course. Here’s a listing of the available modules:

Learning Module 1 – Welcome to Peace Pedagogy
Learning Module 2 – Peace Education Voices
Learning Module 3 – Community Building
Learning Module 4 – Social and Emotional Intelligence
Learning Module 5 – Conflict Resolution
Learning Module 6 – Yoga and Meditation
Learning Module 7 – Nonviolence
Learning Module 8 – Environmental Sustainability

Elicitive Curricular Development: A Manual for Scholar-Practitioners Developing Courses in International Peace and Conflict Studies

This book is co-authored by Peace Studies Innsbruck core faculty Josefina Echavarría Alvarez, Adham Hamed and Noah B. Taylor and it outlines central principles of the University of Innsbruck’s approach to curricular development for Peace and Conflict Studies around the world. It has been authored in the framework of the project Education for Peace in the Iraqi Higher Education System, implemented by the University of Innsbruck in partnership with the Iraqi Al-Amal Association the United Nations Development Program in Iraq and nine Iraqi Universities.

The ECDM is a systematic collection of experiences and lessons identified in academic contexts around the world in Austria, Cambodia, Colombia, Brazil, Ethiopia and Iraq. The ECDM reflects core elicitive principles such as the importance of a focus on relationships, looking beyond the episode of conflict, collaboration, communication and local knowledge. These principles are consistent with the mission of the Research Center for Peace and Conflict (InnPeace) to teach, learn and research as reflective processes of relevant social questions of peace and conflict transformation.

This manual offers helpful guidelines for academic and administrative staff, as well as international cooperation partners trusted with developing peace and conflict courses at the graduate and postgraduate levels.

Quaker Peacemakers Poster Collection

This set of 10 letter-size posters describes the work of 9 Quakers (members of the Religious Society of Friends) active in various domains of peacemaking. Featured peacemakers include Lewis Fry Richardson, Adam Curle, Bayard Rustin, Elise Boulding, Kenneth Boulding, Priscilla Prutzman, Jennifer Beer, Bill Kreidler and George Lakey. Also featured is the Alternatives to Violence Project (AVP), a Quaker-founded program working in prisons and community settings. Each poster includes a quote, a stylized picture and biographical background information on the featured person or project.

Conflict Prevention the GPPAC Way

This animation explains the work of the Global Partnership for the Prevention of Armed Conflict. It explains what conflict prevention is, the impact it has and what GPPAC is doing to prevent armed conflict in different regions of the world.

Drama for Conflict Transformation Toolkit: Youth Theater for Peace

Youth leaders and adult facilitators can use the Drama for Conflict Transformation Toolkit to create a customized training agenda based on their needs, timetable, and cultural context.

Across Kyrgyzstan, youth participants in the Youth Theater for Peace (YTP) program are using the Drama for Conflict Transformation methodology introduced in the toolkit to create community conversation about conflict issues. Since 2010, participants have collaborated with more than 50,000 audience members to talk about solutions to bullying in schools, labor migration, bride kidnapping, resource scarcity, and substance abuse.

Learning Skills of Peace through Every Day Conflicts

Practical Activities and Resources for Families, Teachers and Other Caregivers. Noting that the conflicts arising daily for young children provide an opportunity for adults to model and teach skills for handling conflict peacefully, this guide provides tips for preventing unnecessary conflict, offers “first aid” for conflict moments, and provides resources for addressing common situations that can cause conflict. Developed cooperatively by Ohio’s Commission on Dispute Resolution and Conflict Management, Head Start Association, and Department of Education Division of Early Childhood, with implementation facilitated by many Ohio public libraries, the guide is comprised of 40 thematic units of instruction for the early childhood setting, with most units accompanied by home cards providing tips for preventing conflict and suggested activities. Each unit contains information on the importance of the topic for conflict management and its link to peace, suggested books, activities, and copies of home cards. The 40 units cover: (1) anger and aggression; (2) art; (3) bad day; (4) bad language; (5) bathtime; (6) bedtime; (7) behavior; (8) big and little; (9) big brother, big sister; (10) biting; (11) conflict; (12) cultural diversity; (13) death; (14) disabilities; (15) divorce; (16) dressing; (17) family; (18) fears; (19) feelings and emotions; (20) free choice; (21) lying; (22) mealtime at school; (23) mistakes; (24) nap time at school; (25) new baby; (26) teaching the problem-solving process; (27) safety; (28) school; (29) security objects; (30) self-esteem; (31) sharing; (32) siblings; (33) sickness; (34) stealing; (35) stress; (36) tantrums; (37) time out; (38) transitions; (39) whining and nagging; and (40) work. Also included in the guide are additional resources, such as a list of books for each unit, information on child development and child needs from birth to five years, and suggested readings for teachers and parents.

Creating Spaces for Dialogue – A Role for Civil Society

This manuscript is published by Global Partnership for the Prevention of Armed Conflict (GPPAC) as part of a new GPPAC Dialogue and Mediation series. The stories presented in the book are authored by GPPAC network members who initiated a conversation between communities and societies polarised and divided as a result of conflict. Each story shows how civil society plays a vital role in rebuilding trust and enabling collaborations.

The authors describe how the dialogue processes unfolded, and share resulting lessons and observations. They also present their views on the questions that need to be addressed in designing a meaningful process. Is there such a thing as the most opportune moment to initiate a dialogue? Who should introduce the process? How is the process of participant selection approached, and what are the patterns of relationship transformation? Lastly, what follows once confidence and trust have been established?

The stories include civil society contributions to normalising inter-state relations between the US and Cuba, and Russia and Georgia and chronicles of community dialogues between Serbians and Albanians in Serbia and Kosovo, and Christians and Muslims in Indonesia.

Peace Education Handbook for Educators

The International Falcon Movement – Socialist Educational International (IFM-SEI) celebrated 2015 as their Peace Education Year. IFM-SEI is an international educational movement working to empower children and young people to take an active role in society and fight for their rights. They are an umbrella organisation for child and youth-led movements all over the world, educating on the basis of values of equality, democracy, peace, co-operation and friendship. At the end of their Peace Education Year, IFM-SEI published a handbook of educational activities based around peace education for use in member organisations.

The 87-page handbook includes sections on “Understanding conflict”, “Transforming conflict” and “Making Peace” with activities for all different ages, and that can be used on group nights, on camps or seminars, as an experienced group leader, peer educator, or someone who is running a workshop for the first time.

Learning to Live Together: An intercultural and interfaith programme for ethics education

Learning to Live Together is an interfaith and intercultural programme for Ethics Education that contributes to nurturing ethical values in children and young people. The programme was developed by the Interfaith Council on Ethics Education for Children in close collaboration with UNESCO and UNICEF and tested through the Global Network of Religions for Children to contribute to the realization of the Right of the Child to full and healthy physical, mental, spiritual, moral and social development, and to education as set out in the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC), in article 26.1 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR), in the World Declaration on Education for all and in the Millennium Development Goals.

Learning to Live Together is a programme for educators (teachers, youth leaders, social workers) to nurture ethical values and spirituality in children and youth that will help them strengthen their identity and critical thinking, ability to make well grounded decisions, respect and work with people of other cultures and religions, and foster their individual and collective responsibilities in a global community.

Learning to Live Together is built in two modules, “Understanding Self and Others” and “Transforming the World together”. It is based on four ethical values: respect, empathy, responsibility and reconciliation. The learning process focuses on methodologies based on experience, cooperation, problem solving, discussions and introspection.

Additional materials and versions in other languages are available at http://www.ethicseducationforchildren.org

Teaching Humanitarian Law with Raid Cross

Adolescents are surrounded by violence. Usually they see it in political or historical terms (through the media, teaching and literature) or in the context of amusements (video games, movies). The purpose of Raid Cross, a learning simulation, is to make these adolescents aware of the reality of armed conflict and humanitarian action, thus giving them tools for interpreting events, the news, and violence in general. Raid Cross is an activity that uses international humanitarian law as an instrument for encouraging more extensive thought about human behavior. It focuses on the protection of life and human dignity in wartime and, more generally, in all the experiences of daily life. For more information, visit the Red Cross collection of Resources for Educators.

Peace Education Online Learning Module – UNESCO Education Server

This modular online learning unit on Peace Education is available via the international UNESCO education server D@dalos dedicated to civic and peace education. The content was developed by the Institute for Peace Education in Tübingen, Germany. Main sections include: What is Peace Education?; What does Peace mean?; Why do we need Peace Education?; What do Peace Educators do?; and Peace Education and Fair Play. Includes a section on conflict analysis that provides 10 models for how to approach this task.

Peace One Day Global Truce 2012

Educators are getting involved with the Global Truce 2012 Campaign. Peace One Day led the initiative to establish the first ever annual day of global ceasefire and non-violence, unanimously adopted by United Nations member states as 21 September – Peace Day. You may also know that we then proved that the day could work in areas of conflict, most notably in Afghanistan, where Peace Day agreements have led to the vaccination against polio of 4.5 million children in recent years. We are grateful to UNICEF, WHO, UNAMA and other UN agencies for making it a great success. On Peace Day 2008 the UN Department for Safety and Security announced a 70% reduction in violent incidents in Afghanistan.

These successes and many others led Jeremy Gilley to launch the Global Truce 2012 campaign: what we hope will be the largest reduction of violence on one day – Peace Day 21 September 2012 – a world record; and the largest ever gathering of individuals in the name of peace. Schools can sign up to the Global Truce 2012 Schools’ Network to register your school’s commitment to taking action on Peace Day. Many schools are using the free 32-minute film The Day After Peace as part of their programming.

The Role of Education in Peacebuilding: A synthesis report of findings

This 40-page report by UNICEF provides evidence that education can be a catalyst for peace and highlights the need for education sectors to integrate a peacebuilding perspective. The report has 2 main parts: a literature review, and three case studies focusing on Lebanon, Nepal and Sierra Leone. The report is part of the knowledge generation component of the Education and Emergencies and Post-Crisis Transition (EEPCT) programme – a partnership between UNICEF, the Government of the Netherlands and the European Commission.