Cultivating Peace – Taking Action

This 66-page pdf is a curriculum packet developed for use in Canadian classrooms. “This resource encourages students to examine their own beliefs regarding the need for change in our world and their personal responsibility in taking action. The preconditions necessary for a culture of peace are explored through the examination of global issues in sustainable development, economic disparity, fair trade, human rights and consumerism. Students are given opportunities to explore the range of actions possible, the ways in which change occurs, the barriers to participation and the factors that support youth involvement. The resource includes a teacher’s guide, a video, a poster series and a student guide to taking action. It is designed for use in grades 10-12.”

Creating Spaces for Dialogue – A Role for Civil Society

This manuscript is published by Global Partnership for the Prevention of Armed Conflict (GPPAC) as part of a new GPPAC Dialogue and Mediation series. The stories presented in the book are authored by GPPAC network members who initiated a conversation between communities and societies polarised and divided as a result of conflict. Each story shows how civil society plays a vital role in rebuilding trust and enabling collaborations.

The authors describe how the dialogue processes unfolded, and share resulting lessons and observations. They also present their views on the questions that need to be addressed in designing a meaningful process. Is there such a thing as the most opportune moment to initiate a dialogue? Who should introduce the process? How is the process of participant selection approached, and what are the patterns of relationship transformation? Lastly, what follows once confidence and trust have been established?

The stories include civil society contributions to normalising inter-state relations between the US and Cuba, and Russia and Georgia and chronicles of community dialogues between Serbians and Albanians in Serbia and Kosovo, and Christians and Muslims in Indonesia.

Learning About Human Rights

In 2008, the United Nations initiated a year of human rights learning to mark the 60th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. In the UK, UNA-UK teamed up with UNESCO Associated Schools to produce materials to help secondary school teachers and students explore human rights together.

The resource, now posted to the web as a series of pdfs, contains a teacher’s handbook with slide presentations and corresponding factsheets for students. The five topics covered are:

– the UN Universal Declaration of Human Rights
– the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child
– child rights and armed conflict
– child rights and climate change
– human rights and international development

Learning to Live Together: An intercultural and interfaith programme for ethics education

Learning to Live Together is an interfaith and intercultural programme for Ethics Education that contributes to nurturing ethical values in children and young people. The programme was developed by the Interfaith Council on Ethics Education for Children in close collaboration with UNESCO and UNICEF and tested through the Global Network of Religions for Children to contribute to the realization of the Right of the Child to full and healthy physical, mental, spiritual, moral and social development, and to education as set out in the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC), in article 26.1 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR), in the World Declaration on Education for all and in the Millennium Development Goals.

Learning to Live Together is a programme for educators (teachers, youth leaders, social workers) to nurture ethical values and spirituality in children and youth that will help them strengthen their identity and critical thinking, ability to make well grounded decisions, respect and work with people of other cultures and religions, and foster their individual and collective responsibilities in a global community.

Learning to Live Together is built in two modules, “Understanding Self and Others” and “Transforming the World together”. It is based on four ethical values: respect, empathy, responsibility and reconciliation. The learning process focuses on methodologies based on experience, cooperation, problem solving, discussions and introspection.

Additional materials and versions in other languages are available at http://www.ethicseducationforchildren.org

Youth and Conflict: Best Practices and Lessons Learned

Mercy Corps, as an international NGO focused on “saving and improving lives in the world’s toughest places” believes youth are a force for positive change — the generation that can help transition their countries into productive and secure nations. However, youth are the primary participants in conflict today. The reasons they participate in conflict are multi-dimensional – they lack economic opportunities, political voice and a sense of belonging or connection to their communities. Often the only way young people can imagine changing their predicament is through violence. In Mercy Corps programs the focus is on catalyzing youth’s desire for change into positive outlets.

This 11-page pdf publication is a sample of Youth and Conflict Best Practices and Lessons Learned drawn from Mercy Corps’ programs, other agencies, donors, think tanks and researchers. It is divided into six sections:
* General Program Design and Implementation. This section includes advice on training, as it is a central part of many of our youth programs.
* Economic Engagement
* Political Participation
* Youth-to-Community Connections
* Youth-to-Youth Connections
* Addendum: Lessons from Our Colleagues

Fostering Dialogue Across Divides

This 183-page pdf from the Public Conversations Project (PCP) provides their definitive guide to conducting successful dialogues on the most heated topics. The guide is based on PCP’s experiences working in many different settings and on a wide range of topics, including abortion, foresting practices, the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, sexual orientation and the teachings of Christian scripture, the war in Iraq, interfaith and interethnic relations, and social class differences.

Chapters 1 and 2 provide an overview of PCP’s ways of thinking about dialogue and their core principles and practices. In Chapters 3 through 6, they offer specific advice on each phase in the dialogue process. And in Appendices A through C, they present detailed sample formats, questions, invitations, and handouts that exemplify the principles and practices described in the body of the document.

Note: This guide is also available in spanish via www.publicconversations.org/resources/guides

Peacebuilding Toolkit for Educators – High School Edition

The Peacebuilding Toolkit for Educators is designed to support the work of educators as peacebuilders. It is a resource developed by and for educators, to help introduce peacebuilding themes and skills into the classroom. The Toolkit can help develop students’ understanding of, and interest in, global peacebuilding, and develop their skills and capacities to act as peacebuilders. It can help teachers develop their own understanding of key concepts and skills, and enhance their capacity to teach about global peacebuilding themes and issues. There are two volumes of the toolkit––one for middle school and one for high school.

The High School Edition of the toolkit is designed for a general audience of students in grades 9–12 (ages 14–18). The content can be modified for older students and some of the content can be modified for younger students. High school students are at an ideal stage to talk about peace and conflict, to view the world as an evolving system of relationships, and to prepare themselves to make a positive impact through their choices and actions today and in the future.

The lessons have been developed with great detail to be useful for educators who are new to the methods employed that engage students in experiential learning and critical thinking. The toolkit is organized around basic themes within the field of international conflict management.
Theme 1: Conflict is an inherent part of the human condition.
Theme 2: Violent conflict can be prevented.
Theme 3: There are many ways to be a peacebuilder.

The 15 lessons in the toolkit are interactive and encourage students to work collaboratively to understand concepts and solve problems. The lessons are designed to be detailed enough for a new teacher or a teacher unfamiliar with interactive or experiential methods to pick them up and use them as intended.

Peacebuilding Toolkit for Educators – Middle School Edition

The Peacebuilding Toolkit for Educators is designed to support the work of educators as peacebuilders. It is a resource developed by and for educators, to help introduce peacebuilding themes and skills into the classroom. The Toolkit can help develop students’ understanding of, and interest in, global peacebuilding, and develop their skills and capacities to act as peacebuilders. It can help teachers develop their own understanding of key concepts and skills, and enhance their capacity to teach about global peacebuilding themes and issues. There are two volumes of the toolkit––one for middle school and one for high school.

The Middle School Edition of the toolkit is designed for a general audience of students in grades 6–8. The content can be modified for older students and some of the content can be modified for younger students. Engaging young audiences in conversations about peace and conflict is important. It is the authors’ hope that young students will engage in these topics and continue to reflect on them as they progress through high school and move into the world. The lessons have been developed with great detail to be useful for educators who are new to the methods employed that engage students in experiential learning and critical thinking. The lessons are intended for traditional and alternative education settings. The toolkit is organized around basic themes within the field of international conflict management.
Theme 1: Conflict is an inherent part of the human condition.
Theme 2: Violent conflict can be prevented.
Theme 3: There are many ways to be a peacebuilder.

The 15 lessons in the toolkit are interactive and encourage students to work collaboratively to understand concepts and solve problems. The lessons are designed to be detailed enough for a new teacher or a teacher unfamiliar with interactive or experiential methods to pick them up and use them as intended. The middle school lessons include teacher direction, guided practice, and independent practice.

Peace & Disarmament Education: Changing Mindsets to Reduce Violence & Sustain Removal of Small Arms

This book summarizes the learnings from a partnership between the Hague Appeal for Peace and the United Nations Department for Disarmament Affairs exploring disarmament as an essential issue for peace education.

It seeks to provide educators with ways to bring attention to weapons both as tools and symbols of the culture of violence that perpetuates war and armed conflict. The project invites critical reflection on the acceptance of the inevitability of war, the logic of force in politics and the conflation of conflict with violence. The participating peace educators in Albania, Cambodia, Niger and Peru have challenged these assumptions in community – and schools-based learning experiences that have taught both substantive and symbolic lessons in disarmament.

Peace education: A pathway to a culture of peace (2nd Edition)

209-page pdf book designed to provide educators with the basic knowledge base as well as the skill- and value-orientations that we associate with educating for a culture of peace. Although this work is primarily directed towards the pre-service and in-service preparation of teachers in the formal school system, it may be used in nonformal education.

Part I presents chapters that are meant to help us develop a holistic understanding of peace and peace education. Part II discusses the key themes in peace education. Each chapter starts with a conceptual essay on a theme and is followed by some practical teaching-learning ideas that can either be used in a class or adapted to a community setting. Part III focuses on the peaceable learning climate and the educator, the agent who facilitates the planting and nurturing of the seeds of peace in the learning environment. Finally, the whole school approach is introduced to suggest the need for institutional transformation and the need to move beyond the school towards engagement with other stakeholders in the larger society.

Culture of Peace End of Decade Review

In resolution 64/80, the General Assembly requested UNESCO to prepare a summary report on the activities carried out over the past ten years of the International Decade for a Culture of Peace and Non-Violence for the Children of the World (2001-2010) by UNESCO, other United Nations entities, Member States and civil society, including non-governmental organizations, to promote and implement the Programme of Action on a Culture of Peace.

This end of decade report was presented to the United Nations General Assembly at its 65th session in 2010.

UNESCO’S Work on Education for Peace and Non-Violence: Building Peace Through Education

A 20-page brochure providing an overview of UNESCO’s work in advocacy, policy, information exchange and the development of text books, learning materials and curricula. It was developed by the Section for the Promotion of Rights and Values in Education, Division for the Promotion of Basic Education. Included are links to many useful publications produced by UNESCO and its partners.

Training Module for Education for a Culture of Peace

This module, released in January 1999, is based on experiences working in Sierra-Leone. It was written to provide some relevant information on practical ideas to enhance women’s traditional conflict resolution and mediating practices since they are also stakeholders in conflict situations but are often left out in conflict resolution initiatives.
The material is divided into 8 units.
Unit 1 – Understanding Gender and distinguishing between Gender and Sex Roles
Unit 2 – Trauma Healing and Counselling
Unit 3 – Conflict Resolution
Unit 4 – Gender Awareness in Conflict Resolution/Reconciliation, Concept of Repentance and Forgiveness
Unit 5 – Mediation and the role of Women in Peace Building within the Family, the Community, the School and the total Social Environment
Unit 6 – Raising Awareness of Gender Issues and Peace Building through the use of Drama
Unit 7 – Understanding Basic Rights and Freedom and their Limitations
Unit 8 – Practices for sustaining Peace after the Resolution of Conflict/Institutionalizing transformation

Peace Education Teacher Training Manual

The INEE Peace Education training program was cooperatively developed, based on generic Peace Education materials developed by UNHCR. A pilot project was developed in the multi-ethnic refugee camps in Kenya. The materials were tested, revised and tested again in an iterative process. In 2001 these materials were introduced for refugee and national populations in six countries. This 94-page Teacher Training Manual was written as an adjunct to the school component of the Peace Education Program. The school program includes a Teacher Activity Book, a Story Book, Role-Play cards and a booklet of resource notes for teachers. These were supported by a public awareness component that included 10 posters and in some locations street theatre.

Teachers Without Borders Dr. Joseph Hungwa Memorial Peace Education Program

This 300+ page guide provides a full professional development curriculum in peace education. It was developed by Teachers Beyond Borders. The goal is to bring Peace Education to new audiences around the world.

The program is divided into three units, which progress on a continuum from theoretical to practical. Unit 1 provides the history of peace education, a selection of definitions, an overview of the key thinkers in the peace education field and the core concepts. Unit 2 focuses on the Scope of Peace Education, reviewing different approaches to peace education, or different lenses through which peace education can be viewed. Unit 3 moves from theory to practice, addressing the pedagogical approaches to peace education and practical ways to introduce peace education into your classroom and community.