Policymakers and Administrators

Welcome to the Conflict Resolution Education Connection’s resources for policymakers and administrators. Our goal is to provide information that will support administrators interested in promoting or extending conflict resolution work within education. The sidebar menu to your right provides a listing of the content areas we focus on at this site.

A very young administrator working at desk

CRE Conference Presentations

Restorative Justice

  • Presented by: Gary Shaw
  • View Presentation and Abstract: Click Here

Values Education, Quality Teaching and Safe Schools (Australia)

  • Presented by: Gary Shaw
  • View Presentation and Abstract: Click Here

Supporting Community “Thirdsiders” via the East Side Conflict Resolution Outreach Project

  • Presented by: Bill Warters and Daniela Shuke, Wayne State University MADR Program
  • View Presentation and Abstract: Click Here

CRETE Web Resources

  • Presented by: Bill Warters
  • View Presentation and Abstract: Click Here

Neighbor Circles as a Tool for Building Community

  • Presented by: Mark Chupp, Case Western Reserve University
  • View Presentation and Abstract: Click Here

Conflict Resolution Education and Peace Education: Proven Impacts

  • Presented by: Tricia S. Jones
  • View Presentation and Abstract: Click Here

View More Presentations Here


Sample Catalog Resources

Below you'll find a randomized listing of up to 20 related items (we may have more...) drawn from our Resource Catalog.

Resource Title Description Links
Culture of honesty earns a degree of respect, A: Facilitating academic honesty at the University of Pdf article from Conflict Management in Higher Education Report, Volume 2, Number 3, (May 2002), discusses the University of Georgia's mediation policies and procedures for resolving academic dishonesty disputes.
National policies on education for democratic citizenship in the Americas: Analytic report 48-page PDF report with the goal of "address[ing] the gap in the literature on national policies in citizenship education in the Americas, providing an initial “mapping” of these policies, at the formal and non-formal levels. To that end, the analysis focuses on national policies and standards, the school curriculum within which citizenship education is embedded, places and age levels where citizenship education occurs, and the extent to which citizenship programs are evaluated. Twenty-five countries participated in this study. Selected demographic characteristics of the countries are reported in Appendix 1."
International Conflict Resolution Education Summary Slideshow Powerpoint presentation examining conflict resolution education activities around the globe.
Hip-Hop artists: Lesson and activity excerpted from the Tanenbaum curriculum COEXIST 5-page PDF lesson plan in which students (grade 6-12), "will learn about stereotypes as well as how to identify and challenge their own biases. Students will also make connections to religion as an important aspect of identity and an influence within the realm of Hip-Hop."
Alternative dispute resolution at public colleges: Overcoming two built-in legal hurdles Pdf article from Conflict Management in Higher Education Report, Volume 6, Number 1, (Nov 2005), which investigates the fact that, "Public colleges face two special challenges in resolving disputes that involve students, employees and outsiders, the first is the problem of due process and the second is the problem of free speech, these are problems that public colleges face simply because they are part of the government."
Summary - The Positive impact of social & emotional learning kindergarten to eighth grade students 12-page PDF report which, "summarizes results from three large-scale reviews of research on the impact of social and emotional learning (SEL) programs on elementary and middle-school students — that is, programs that seek to promote various aocial and emotional skills. Collectively the three reviews included 317 studies and involved 324,303 children. SEL programs yielded multiple benefits in each review and were effective in both school and after-school settings and for students with and without behavioral and emotional problems. They were also effective across the K-8 grade range and for racially and ethnically diverse students from urban, rural, and suburban settings. SEL programs improved students’ social-emotional skills, attitudes about self and others, connection to school, positive social behavior, and academic performance; they also reduced students’ conduct problems and emotional distress. Comparing results from these reviews to findings obtained in reviews of interventions by other research teams suggests that SEL programs are among the most successful youth-development programs offered to school-age youth. Furthermore, school staff (e.g., teachers, student support staff) carried out SEL programs effectively, indicating that they can be incorporated into routine educational practice. In addition, SEL programming improved students’ academic performance by 11 to 17 percentile points across the three reviews, indicating that they offer students a practical educational benefit. Given these positive findings, we recommend that federal, state, and local policies and practices encourage the broad implementation of well-designed, evidence-based SEL programs during and after school."
Making things right: Restorative justice comes to campuses Pdf article from Conflict Management in Higher Education Report, Volume 1, Number 1, (Jan/Feb 2000), discussing the use of restorative justice principles for "creative options to traditional justice systems, options which are flexible enough to allow positive productive responses to a variety of offenses or violations and which also meet the unique needs of the University community."
25 years: Looking back and looking ahead 20-page Powerpoint keynote address given at the Sustaining Conflict Resolution Education: Building Bridges to the Future conference in Fairfax, VA, which reviewed "the CRE field from the vantage point of Educators for Social Responsibility (ESR)."
M.O.V.E.: Mind over violence everywhere 88-page PDF manual developed to provide learning materials on violence prevention for youth with low literacy skills. The objectives of M.O.V.E. are to: Increase awareness of violence and develop skills to prevent violence, increase literacy through non-traditional learning activities, encourage youth to participate actively and assist the facilitator in recording the workshop responses. The program is organized into five sections: Learning and thinking styles, Communication rights and responsibilities, Peer mediation, Resisting peer pressure and Social action.
Evolution of the Role of Ombudsperson on University and College Campuses, The Pdf article reprinted from the February/March 1995 Issue (Vol 55) of The Fourth R, The Newsletter of the National Association for Mediation in Education which discusses the history and role of ombuds people in colleges and universities.
Licensure Report - Conflict Management Pilot Program In North Carolina A 9-page pdf document discussing the experiences of Center for the Prevention of School Violence's "Reach In, Reach Out, Reach Over Conflict Management Curriculum" development initiative and related work done on revising statewide licensure of new teachers to include conflict management concepts and skills. Includes reports on results of focus groups with preservice teachers regarding the need for conflict management skills development. As the report indicates, "Although the goal of implementing a teacher licensure enhancement can be ambitious, there were a number of supporting factors for the initiative and foreseeable challenges that were addressed."
Restorative justice in the classroom: Lesson 2 class meetings 8-page pdf lesson which "through role-play and discussion, this lesson will help students understand the motives behind offending and re-offending and to develop problem-solving consequences that will help offenders learn a better way to behave. By developing restorative consequences, the classroom community can help the offender repair the harm he/she has caused and discourage the offender from re-offending. Students practice consensus building and explore the consequence-setting aspect of justice circles."
Practicing peace: A peace education module for standards 4 through 6 in Solomon Islands 87-page word document which presents peace education for the Solomon Islands context. "The primary method used in peace education is generally referred to as a "facilitated" or "interactive" model of teaching. In this method, the teacher becomes a facilitator of learning and a co-learner with the students. Students and teachers use experiential strategies to practice skills for peace. There is a shift in the value placed on being a teacher. Using the facilitated processes of conflict resolution and peace education, teachers and students learn together and teach each other." Covered areas include: Interpersonal skills; Understanding and accepting differences; Children's rights; Building community and Mediation.
Regional Meetings benefit campus conflict resolution efforts Pdf article from Conflict Management in Higher Education Report, Volume 2, Number 1, (Oct 2001), presenting highlights of meetings for conflict resolution professionals across the United States.
Schools conflict resolution and mediation competition: Manual 27-page pdf manual for SCRAM a, "Year 9 & 10 interactive role play program which encourages the development of mediation skills in secondary school students. The mediation is based on fictitious community based scenario. A team of 6-8 students is given background information on an issue which is causing conflict among 4 participants. The team uses this information to practice their mediation skills." Objectives for the students include: Learning to manage conflict in a productive way, to encourage the development of self esteem through self awareness, to encourage the development of self esteem through self responsibility, to encourage the parties to identify the issues that are in dispute, considering options, working towards an agreement that will meet the needs of all parties and encouraging the development of self esteem. For practice training scenarios go to: http://www.scram.business.ecu.edu.au/scenario.htm To find out more information about SCRAM see their website at: http://www.scram.business.ecu.edu.au/
Eight ways to connect with global CR education via creducation.org 46-page Powerpoint presentation given at the Youth and Conflict: Global Challenges - Local Strategies held in Cleveland, Ohio, which "introduces various ways that organizations and individuals working around the world on conflict resolution education and peace education can share their ideas and materials with a larger audience, the focus is on ways to contribute to the Conflict Resolution Education Connection located online at www.creducation.org."
What's in a name?: Capturing the essence of campus mediation Pdf article reprinted from the February/March 1995 Issue (Vol 55) of The Fourth R, The Newsletter of the National Association for Mediation in Education which describes the comprehensive set of activities offered by Campus Mediation Center at Syracuse University.
SCORE Quick Reference Guide to Peer Mediation for Students 10-page guide for student peer mediators that reviews the mediation process and provides practice tips. Developed for use by the Student Conflict Resolution Experts (SCORE) program in Massachusetts as "a quick reference guide for students to accompany their training".
Recommended standards for school-based peer mediation programs Twenty-eight page document presenting standards for school-based peer mediation programs that are designed to enhance quality and stimulate thought among youth and adult participants in peer mediation programs. Aids in the creation and implementation of programs, designing curricula and evaluation procedures, funding and promoting programs, providing professional development and setting guidelines for research.
Creating schoolwide prevention and intervention strategies: Effective strategies... 55-page PDF document which is "intended to put the issue of schoolwide violence prevention in context for educators and outline an approach for choosing and creating effective prevention programs. The guide covers the following topics: 1. Why schoolwide prevention strategies are critical, 2. Characteristics of a safe school, 3. Four sources of vulnerability to school violence, 4. How to plan for strategies that meet school safety needs, 5. Five effective response strategies and 6. Useful Web and print resources."