Cultivating Peace – Taking Action

This 66-page pdf is a curriculum packet developed for use in Canadian classrooms. “This resource encourages students to examine their own beliefs regarding the need for change in our world and their personal responsibility in taking action. The preconditions necessary for a culture of peace are explored through the examination of global issues in sustainable development, economic disparity, fair trade, human rights and consumerism. Students are given opportunities to explore the range of actions possible, the ways in which change occurs, the barriers to participation and the factors that support youth involvement. The resource includes a teacher’s guide, a video, a poster series and a student guide to taking action. It is designed for use in grades 10-12.”

Peace Education Handbook for Educators

The International Falcon Movement – Socialist Educational International (IFM-SEI) celebrated 2015 as their Peace Education Year. IFM-SEI is an international educational movement working to empower children and young people to take an active role in society and fight for their rights. They are an umbrella organisation for child and youth-led movements all over the world, educating on the basis of values of equality, democracy, peace, co-operation and friendship. At the end of their Peace Education Year, IFM-SEI published a handbook of educational activities based around peace education for use in member organisations.

The 87-page handbook includes sections on “Understanding conflict”, “Transforming conflict” and “Making Peace” with activities for all different ages, and that can be used on group nights, on camps or seminars, as an experienced group leader, peer educator, or someone who is running a workshop for the first time.

Peacebuilding Toolkit for Educators – High School Edition

The Peacebuilding Toolkit for Educators is designed to support the work of educators as peacebuilders. It is a resource developed by and for educators, to help introduce peacebuilding themes and skills into the classroom. The Toolkit can help develop students’ understanding of, and interest in, global peacebuilding, and develop their skills and capacities to act as peacebuilders. It can help teachers develop their own understanding of key concepts and skills, and enhance their capacity to teach about global peacebuilding themes and issues. There are two volumes of the toolkit––one for middle school and one for high school.

The High School Edition of the toolkit is designed for a general audience of students in grades 9–12 (ages 14–18). The content can be modified for older students and some of the content can be modified for younger students. High school students are at an ideal stage to talk about peace and conflict, to view the world as an evolving system of relationships, and to prepare themselves to make a positive impact through their choices and actions today and in the future.

The lessons have been developed with great detail to be useful for educators who are new to the methods employed that engage students in experiential learning and critical thinking. The toolkit is organized around basic themes within the field of international conflict management.
Theme 1: Conflict is an inherent part of the human condition.
Theme 2: Violent conflict can be prevented.
Theme 3: There are many ways to be a peacebuilder.

The 15 lessons in the toolkit are interactive and encourage students to work collaboratively to understand concepts and solve problems. The lessons are designed to be detailed enough for a new teacher or a teacher unfamiliar with interactive or experiential methods to pick them up and use them as intended.

Peacebuilding Toolkit for Educators – Middle School Edition

The Peacebuilding Toolkit for Educators is designed to support the work of educators as peacebuilders. It is a resource developed by and for educators, to help introduce peacebuilding themes and skills into the classroom. The Toolkit can help develop students’ understanding of, and interest in, global peacebuilding, and develop their skills and capacities to act as peacebuilders. It can help teachers develop their own understanding of key concepts and skills, and enhance their capacity to teach about global peacebuilding themes and issues. There are two volumes of the toolkit––one for middle school and one for high school.

The Middle School Edition of the toolkit is designed for a general audience of students in grades 6–8. The content can be modified for older students and some of the content can be modified for younger students. Engaging young audiences in conversations about peace and conflict is important. It is the authors’ hope that young students will engage in these topics and continue to reflect on them as they progress through high school and move into the world. The lessons have been developed with great detail to be useful for educators who are new to the methods employed that engage students in experiential learning and critical thinking. The lessons are intended for traditional and alternative education settings. The toolkit is organized around basic themes within the field of international conflict management.
Theme 1: Conflict is an inherent part of the human condition.
Theme 2: Violent conflict can be prevented.
Theme 3: There are many ways to be a peacebuilder.

The 15 lessons in the toolkit are interactive and encourage students to work collaboratively to understand concepts and solve problems. The lessons are designed to be detailed enough for a new teacher or a teacher unfamiliar with interactive or experiential methods to pick them up and use them as intended. The middle school lessons include teacher direction, guided practice, and independent practice.

Inside Contexts – Encountering Conflict

This guide for educators explores the concept of conflict as a way to teach English in an interesting way. It was developed by the Victoria Association for the Teaching of English. It uses four texts that explore different types and levels of conflict against a variety of settings, modern and historical. The texts are The Secret River by Kate Grenville, The Crucible by Arthur Miller, Paradise Road by Bruce Beresford, and The Rugmaker of Mazar-e-Sharif by R Hillman and N Mazari.

Nonviolence: An Assertive Approach to Conflict

This 50-minute activity lesson plan takes the Occupy Wall Street protest movement as a jumping off point to explore different approaches to resolving conflicts. The lesson is structured to help students explore what escalates/deescalates conflict; look at the difference between aggressive, submissive and assertive responses to conflict; focus on nonviolent action as an assertive response to conflict; and learn about Occupy Wall Street’s use of nonviolence as a strategy.

The Zone – Online Conflict Learning Module for Youth by Aik Saath

An interactive online learning module focusing on conflict and conflict resolution for young people of diverse backgrounds. Topics include the roots, the conflict, the effects and the resolution. Illustrated with animated storyboards and roll-over graphics.

Training of Teachers in Areas of Armed Conflict

This 64-page practice manual was written by Dr. Anica Mikus Kos, a pediatrician and child psychiatrist from Slovenia. It was published as a supplement in the online journal Intervention: International Journal of Mental Health, Psychosocial Work and Counselling in Areas of Armed Conflict, Vol 3 No. 2 ; July 2005

Nonviolence playlets

25-page MS Word document providing examples of nonviolence in action. “These short playlets are intended to dramatically reconstruct actual experiences in which nonviolent direct action has been used, successfully, to overcome violence.” Designed for use with youth of different ages.

Licensure Report – Conflict Management Pilot Program In North Carolina

A 9-page pdf document discussing the experiences of Center for the Prevention of School Violence’s “Reach In, Reach Out, Reach Over Conflict Management Curriculum” development initiative and related work done on revising statewide licensure of new teachers to include conflict management concepts and skills. Includes reports on results of focus groups with preservice teachers regarding the need for conflict management skills development. As the report indicates, “Although the goal of implementing a teacher licensure enhancement can be ambitious, there were a number of supporting factors for the initiative and foreseeable challenges that were addressed.”

Will you listen?: Young voices from conflict zones

28-page pdf report which accompanies “the official 10 year Graca Machel Strategic Review report … submitted to the UN General Assembly on October 17, 2007. It compiles the views and recommendations from more than 1,700 young people from 92 countries through focus group discussions … [which] included children and young people who have experienced conflict themselves, with many of the participants speaking about how their own lives have been affected. Facilitators tried to ensure a safe environment, to use the local language where appropriate and to create a certain ‘comfort level’ for the participants despite the unique challenges in each country.”

A Comparison of Two Models Used to Predict Student Strategy Choice for Classroom Conflicts

Although the topic of conflict has received much attention in communication literature, the topic of conflicts between students and teachers has not. The purpose of this dissertation was twofold: to examine what classroom conflicts exist between students and teachers, and to determine which of two existing model best predicts conflict strategy choices for students. In communication literature, there is a divide in how conflict resolution is examined. Some researchers do so using communication predispositions such as argumentativeness, verbal aggressiveness, communication anxiety, and communication competence as a basis for predicting conflict strategies. Other researchers predict strategies from the perspective of attributions made in conflict episodes. In this research, two studies were conducted. First, 710 students were asked to identify conflicts they had experienced with classroom teachers. These conflicts were coded and categories of classroom conflicts emerged around the themes of class/work conflicts and teacher personality conflicts. From these responses, a new instrument for studying conflict, the Student-Teacher Conflict Index, was developed. In the second study, 171 students were presented with the new index which contained several hypothetical classroom conflicts. The students were asked to identify how they would respond in each situation. Discriminant analyses were conducted to determine whether a communication predisposition model or an attributional model best predicted students’ strategy choices. A mixed model was determined to best predict strategies with the trait of verbal aggressiveness, and attributions of responsibility, stability, and personal control being the strongest predictors. Additionally, it was determined that strategy choice seemed to influence channel selection: More students who chose distributive strategies selected mediated channels to communicate than did students who chose integrative strategies. Most of the hypotheses involving communication predispositions and strategy choice were supported, while the hypotheses involving attributions and strategy choice were not. These results were interpreted and discussed. Following this, suggestions for future research are proposed. Examining teachers’ approaches to conflict, or examining the affect of culture on classroom conflict are two examples of ways that this research could be developed further.

Road to peace, The: A teaching guide on local and global transitional justice

10-chapter teaching guide “that introduces students who have a general knowledge of human rights to the concept of transitional justice. Using the expertise of The Advocates’ human rights monitoring teams, who carried out work in Peru and Sierra Leone, The Advocates for Human Rights has created this teaching guide to be used with ninth grade through adult learners … The Road to Peace, as its title suggests, does not just teach about justice, but seeks to advance justice. The lessons are planned to encourage creative thinking about conflict resolution and restoration of justice, so that students feel empowered to promote justice in their own communities as well as around the world. The Road to Peace teaches about justice on a local and an international scale, asking students to make connections between instances of justice and injustice in their own lives, and in situations where justice has been or is being threatened in other countries … this comprehensive teaching guide introduces students to the concept of transitional justice through:
* Lessons on the root causes of war and conflict
* An overview of human rights and different transitional justice mechanisms
* Mock war crimes tribunal and mock truth commission role plays
* In-depth country case studies
* Individual case studies on human rights abuses
* Investigative tools to study the need for transitional justice in the U.S.
* Skill-building resources on how to apply reconciliation on a local level
* Conflict resolution and peer mediation exercises
* A transitional justice glossary
* Resources for further study and action on peace and justice.” Includes detailed glossary, organizations list and bibliography.