Issues under the hat

Web-based interactive resource which presents a scenario that “will weigh a school policy in this case disallowing students to wear hats in the classroom against good reasons why in some situations a hat could be allowable. At one point during the scenario, [the participant] will be asked to choose of three available options that might lead to a win-win solution or to further problems for both the student and the teacher.”

Practicing peace: A peace education module for standards 4 through 6 in Solomon Islands

87-page pdf document which presents peace education for the Solomon Islands context. “The primary method used in peace education is generally referred to as a “facilitated” or “interactive” model of teaching. In this method, the teacher becomes a facilitator of learning and a co-learner with the students. Students and teachers use experiential strategies to practice skills for peace. There is a shift in the value placed on being a teacher. Using the facilitated processes of conflict resolution and peace education, teachers and students learn together and teach each other.” Covered areas include: Interpersonal skills; Understanding and accepting differences; Children’s rights; Building community and Mediation.

Practicing peace: A peace education module for standards 4 through 6 in Solomon Islands

87-page word document which presents peace education for the Solomon Islands context. “The primary method used in peace education is generally referred to as a “facilitated” or “interactive” model of teaching. In this method, the teacher becomes a facilitator of learning and a co-learner with the students. Students and teachers use experiential strategies to practice skills for peace. There is a shift in the value placed on being a teacher. Using the facilitated processes of conflict resolution and peace education, teachers and students learn together and teach each other.” Covered areas include: Interpersonal skills; Understanding and accepting differences; Children’s rights; Building community and Mediation.

Building empathy: Creating community

32-page pdf handbook created, “to help students explore new ways of interacting through a process of learning about — and learning to honor — one another’s individuality. Learning about peers humanizes people and helps them to identify with one another rather than ostracize or alienate. The activities below are designed to help individuals — particularly independent-minded pre-teens and teens — think of their classroom or school as a community and thereby experience solidarity with their peers.”

Reaching across boundaries: Talk to create change

21-page pdf handbook which, “shows you how to conduct Mix It Up Dialogues. In the dialogues, participants will have honest discussions about social boundaries, and they will plan action projects that help cross those boundaries … Mix It Up Dialogues aren’t just about talking, however. They’re also about taking action — changing personal behaviors that may hurt or exclude others and engaging in collective projects to improve school climate.”

Harmony Island STAR and APE Activity Handouts

This 6-page pdf provides colorful poster and handout examples excerpted from the Teacher’s Guide for Harmony Island by Academic Edge, Inc. Harmony Island is a multimedia-enhanced conflict resolution curriculum designed to help learners broaden their understanding of conflicts and develop their conflict resolution skills. Students are introduced to core strategies that have proven to be effective in conflict resolution. STAR (Stop, Think, Act, Refect) is a series of steps learners can take to think about and avoid or resolve conflicts. APE (Active Listening, Problem Solving, and Emotional Awareness) is an acronym that summarizes some of the key skills involved in avoiding and resolving conflicts. The full teachers guide and information on purchasing the game materials is available via www.harmonyisland.org

Schools conflict resolution and mediation competition: Manual

27-page pdf manual for SCRAM a, “Year 9 & 10 interactive role play program which encourages the development of mediation skills in secondary school students. The mediation is based on fictitious community based scenario. A team of 6-8 students is given background information on an issue which is causing conflict among 4 participants. The team uses this information to practice their mediation skills.” Objectives for the students include: Learning to manage conflict in a productive way, to encourage the development of self esteem through self awareness, to encourage the development of self esteem through self responsibility, to encourage the parties to identify the issues that are in dispute, considering options, working towards an agreement that will meet the needs of all parties and encouraging the development of self esteem. For practice training scenarios go to: http://www.scram.business.ecu.edu.au/scenario.htm To find out more information about SCRAM see their website at: http://www.scram.business.ecu.edu.au/

Tackling tough topics: An educator’s guide for working with military kids

12-page pdf booklet “created by the Washington State Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction to assist educators in better understanding and being responsive to the unique issues facing military kids whose parents or loved ones have been or are currently deployed. It provides practical, hands-on information to help those in school settings deal with the “tough to talk about” topics students experience in the schools setting including: Talking to Kids About Violence, Terrorism, and War; Supporting Military Kids During Deployment, Homecoming, and
Reunion; Helping Kids Cope with Stress; Understanding the Impact of Grief and Loss; Coping with Death and Fostering Resilience.”

In the mix lesson plan: Cliques, friendship groups, or boxes

Web based lesson plan which “helps students explore the social ‘boxes’ that they place themselves in or are put in by others, and focus on how they judge one another. The lesson can also serve as a training session for students who wish to be Big Brothers and Sisters to incoming freshmen, or student facilitators of Human Relations groups — two programs that promote a greater sense of community within schools.” Draws on materials provided by PBS’s In the Mix program http://to.pbs.org/2sX2aD2

A Comparison of Two Models Used to Predict Student Strategy Choice for Classroom Conflicts

Although the topic of conflict has received much attention in communication literature, the topic of conflicts between students and teachers has not. The purpose of this dissertation was twofold: to examine what classroom conflicts exist between students and teachers, and to determine which of two existing model best predicts conflict strategy choices for students. In communication literature, there is a divide in how conflict resolution is examined. Some researchers do so using communication predispositions such as argumentativeness, verbal aggressiveness, communication anxiety, and communication competence as a basis for predicting conflict strategies. Other researchers predict strategies from the perspective of attributions made in conflict episodes. In this research, two studies were conducted. First, 710 students were asked to identify conflicts they had experienced with classroom teachers. These conflicts were coded and categories of classroom conflicts emerged around the themes of class/work conflicts and teacher personality conflicts. From these responses, a new instrument for studying conflict, the Student-Teacher Conflict Index, was developed. In the second study, 171 students were presented with the new index which contained several hypothetical classroom conflicts. The students were asked to identify how they would respond in each situation. Discriminant analyses were conducted to determine whether a communication predisposition model or an attributional model best predicted students’ strategy choices. A mixed model was determined to best predict strategies with the trait of verbal aggressiveness, and attributions of responsibility, stability, and personal control being the strongest predictors. Additionally, it was determined that strategy choice seemed to influence channel selection: More students who chose distributive strategies selected mediated channels to communicate than did students who chose integrative strategies. Most of the hypotheses involving communication predispositions and strategy choice were supported, while the hypotheses involving attributions and strategy choice were not. These results were interpreted and discussed. Following this, suggestions for future research are proposed. Examining teachers’ approaches to conflict, or examining the affect of culture on classroom conflict are two examples of ways that this research could be developed further.

Conflict resolution workshop

Website hosted by CanTeach (a site created to assist teachers in finding and using resources online) which introduces the concept of conflict resolution and shows educators how one can recognize and solve problems in the classroom, handouts and practice scenarios are provided.

Inter-agency peace education programme: Skills for constructive living: Overview of the programme

46-page pdf document which provides an overview “of the components of the Peace Education Programme and the implementation structure of the programme. It is designed for education managers of ministries dealing with both formal and non-formal education and from agencies who may be implementing education activities on behalf of the government …
The programme is currently being implemented in eleven countries in Africa and has been integrated into complementary programmes in Sri Lanka, Kosovo, and Pakistan. In these latter situations, training and initial materials were provided but the implementation costs were borne by the agencies concerned.”
Related to this overview are 15 pdf documents that make up the Peace Education Programme kit with individual entries in this catalog.

Peace education and conflict resolution: Handbook for school-based projects

44-page pdf “handbook about project-work on peace education and conflict resolution in schools is based on the experiences of the International School Network: Peace Education and Conflict Resolution from 1994 – 1998. The aims of the Network were to create an international community of researchers, to learn skills of conflict analysis and conflict resolution, to learn research skills, to co-operate across cultures to resolve conflicts, to gain insight into different possibilities for conflict resolution in different settings and cultures and to make a contribution to the theory and practice of conflict resolution.” Includes resource list.

Peer leadership: Helping youth become change agents in their schools and communities

63-page pdf guide which, “provides educators, law enforcement personnel, parents, and other family
and community members with information and resources for establishing peer leadership
programs in secondary schools and youth service organizations that give students the skills and
confidence to stand up for civility in their schools and communities and to become role models in confronting bias-motivated harassment.” Includes a list of a variety of peer leadership program models from around the country and bibliographical references.

Building community and combating hate: Lessons from the middle school classroom

65-page pdf document which, “includes a set of ten
lessons for middle school educators or youth service professionals to use within their existing curriculum.
The lessons reinforce concepts discussed throughout the Partners Against Hate publication Program Activity Guide: Helping Youth Resist Bias and Hate, 2nd edition. The lessons explore the following four themes that encourage individual and collective reflection, research, and action.” Includes bibliographical references.